Tim O’Mara, MD
June 22, 2017
Michael Kalisvaart MD
June 22, 2017

Gregory Lundeen, MD

Specialties: Foot & Ankle Surgery, Total Ankle Replacement, & Limb & Joint Preservation

Fellowship: Foot & Ankle Surgery

Board Certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Dr. Lundeen joined Reno Orthopedic Clinic in 2006. He uses a team approach to provide the highest quality medical and orthopedic care, focused on working together with each patient toward the best possible outcome.

Dr. Lundeen received his medical degree from the University of Utah and completed his orthopedic residency at the Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. His subspecialty training in foot and ankle surgery included fellowships in Sydney, Australia and Oakland, California. He has advanced training in total ankle joint replacement and has specialty training in limb and joint preservation for patients facing possible amputation. He is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Team Physician for:

 

View Professional Profile

Professional Profile of Dr. Gregory Lundeen, MD

Inspired beginnings
Dr. Lundeen spent his childhood running around Southeastern Idaho. His developing aspirations eventually led him through a series of educational experiences that unfolded over more than a decade, crossing four state borders and one international border, culminating in the establishment of his current practice in Reno.

 

Home to practice in the West
After his fellowship training in Oakland, Dr. Lundeen accepted an invitation to join the experts at Reno Orthopedic Clinic (ROC), returning to his native western roots and making his home in Reno. He has since developed and extended his foot and ankle specialty practice in the local community, the state of Nevada, and beyond. At the epicenter of his practice expansion, in 2014 he founded the opening of The Center for Foot & Ankle within ROC, where he and his colleagues and team offer comprehensive, gold standard orthopedic care for patients with foot and ankle conditions.

An orthopedic MD is born
As described in his curriculum vitae, after graduating from high school in Idaho Falls, he left for the University of Utah in Salt Lake City where he completed an Honors Bachelor of Science (HBS) degree in Biology, followed by a Master’s degree in Public Health (MPH). During this period he found his true interest in the art and science of medicine. He spent the next four years completing his Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree at the University of Utah, which included clinical and research experience in the musculoskeletal system, meaning the bones, joints, and connecting tissues (muscles, tendons, and ligaments) of the body. This fostered what has become his lifetime passion for orthopedic surgery and caring for his patients.

Feet and ankles
Upon completion of medical school, Dr. Lundeen was accepted to his first choice in orthopedic surgery training at the Carolinas Medical Center Orthopedic Residency Program in Charlotte, NC. There he spent five years studying musculoskeletal injuries, deformities, and painful conditions, while gaining invaluable clinical and surgical knowledge, skills, and experience. The result was an extensive understanding and surgical expertise in treating and managing these conditions.

G’Day, Oakland
After completing his five-year orthopedic residency training in Charlotte, he then pursued an additional year of orthopedic clinical and surgical training specifically in the treatment of feet and ankles. This advanced training — called a “fellowship” — is a dedicated time that a surgeon spends learning from well-established experts in his field of interest. Dr. Lundeen actually pursued two fellowships after his residency. The first led him and his family across international waters to Sydney, Australia. Under the direction of Dr. Martin Sullivan, an internationally recognized orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Lundeen further developed his orthopedic expertise through a specialized focus on cartilage repair techniques and treatment of sports-related foot and ankle injuries. He then relocated his family to Oakland, California where he spent his second fellowship working with Dr. Roger Mann, a world-renowned orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. Dr. Mann is considered to be “the grandfather of foot and ankle surgery” and wrote the textbook that essentially all orthopedic surgeons refer to during and after their foot and ankle training. It was during this second fellowship that Dr. Lundeen was first trained in “total ankle replacement” surgery, which restores mobility to patients with ankle arthritis.

A mature practice
In his practice, Dr. Lundeen has continued to pursue with great passion the ongoing development of clinical and surgical expertise of the same quality that motivated him during his years of medical and orthopedic educational training. He has completed advanced training in total ankle joint replacement using the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR®) device as his implant of choice, which has over 30 years of proven reliability in treating patients with ankle arthritis. Its technical design as a “mobile bearing” device gives it the distinction of most closely matching the natural design and movement of the ankle joint, and is the only such device approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). As of April 2016, he has performed over 100 total ankle replacement surgeries and has presented research findings at international meetings supporting good patient outcomes after total ankle surgery.

Helping others
For patients with limb-threatening conditions, Dr. Lundeen is also trained and experienced with limb preservation techniques, including use of the Illizaov (external fixator) technique for correcting severe deformities and managing severe joint arthritis. In 2014, Dr. Lundeen also played a key role in the development of the Renown Limb Preservation Service at Renown Regional Medical Center. He serves as the program’s Director and works closely with surgeons and physicians from other specialties and with wound care experts to offer the best treatment for patients with such conditions.

When feet hurt
Dr. Lundeen and his team enjoy taking care of all patient needs related to the foot and ankle. He appreciates the complexities and subtle findings in issues big and small, enabling decisive diagnostic care with the best and fastest recovery. He manages problems without surgery if possible, with a strong belief in the human body’s ability to heal itself. He and his team also implement other nonsurgical methods including casting, bracing, physical therapy, and orthotics. Surgery is only recommended if a successful nonoperative method will not suffice.

Preparing the next generation
Development of medical and orthopedic education is an important part of Dr. Lundeen’s orthopedic practice. He actively participates in mentoring medical students and residents from the University of Nevada. Continuing the legacy offered to him, in 2015 he launched the ROC Foot and Ankle Fellowship Program. In partnership with the University of California, Davis, this is a year-round fellowship offering expert surgical training for surgeons who have just completed their orthopedic residency.

Contributing to the science
Dr. Lundeen and his team are continually engaged in research projects that investigate better techniques and methods for optimizing patient care. He is also a reviewer of medical articles being considered for publication in the peer-reviewed orthopedic journals, Foot and Ankle International and Techniques in Foot and Ankle Surgery. He believes support of medical education and orthopedic research enables him and his team to provide the best care for patients, keeping The Center’s foot and ankle practice in the position of offering state-of-the-art information and treatment to patients.

Practicing what you believe
Understanding the importance of keeping himself and his patients mobile and active, Dr. Lundeen enjoys mountain biking, snow skiing, running, river rafting, and many other outdoor activities. In keeping up with an active population, he has been a US Ski Team Physician Pool Member since 2007. He travels with the US Ski Team and covers World Cup ski racing events in North America and Europe. He also assists with treating foot and ankle injuries among local athletes including the Bighorns, the Aces, and local school athletic programs.

Belief in the team
Two very important components of patient care are choice and timely access. To meet varying needs, Dr. Lundeen has gathered a team that is dedicated to offering specialized care in the shortest possible time frame. As part of his care beliefs, he works closely with nurse practitioner Linda Dunaway, who has worked exclusively with him since 2009. He has also been involved with local, state, and national medical and orthopedic societies to promote the open and easily accessible health care system that our community deserves. He holds an active membership in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), which represents the 2,200-plus orthopedic surgeons in the world who specialize in treatment of the foot and ankle.

View Dr. Gregory Lundeen's Publications

Professional Profile of Dr. Gregory Lundeen, MD

Journal & Educational Publications


Lundeen GA, Dunaway LJ. Immediate unrestricted postoperative weightbearing and mobilization after bone marrow stimulation of large osteochondral lesions of the talus. Cartilage. In press 2016.

Lundeen GA, Roster B, Dunaway LJ. The adult cavus deformity in neuromuscular disorders. Chapman’s Comprehensive Orthopaedic Surgery, 4th ed. Ch. 8.27. Philadelphia, PA: JP Medical Publishers; in press 2016.

Lundeen GA, Daws S, Dunaway LJ. Techniques for first metatarsophalangeal joint salvage associated with failed hallux valgus surgery. Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery. In press 2016.

Lundeen GA, Clanton TO, Dunaway LJ, Lu Minggen. Motion at the tibial and polyethylene component interface in a mobile-bearing total ankle replacement. Foot & Ankle Int. In press 2016.

 Lundeen GA, Dunaway LJ. Etiology and treatment of delayed-onset medial malleolar pain following total ankle arthroplasty. Foot & Ankle Int. In press 2016.

 Lundeen GA, Simpson LA, Bray TJ. Ankle fracture malunion and late syndesmosis reconstruction. Master Techniques in Orthopaedic Surgery: The Foot and Ankle, 3rd ed. Ch. 32:495-513. Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013.

 Lundeen GA, Dunaway, LJ. Anterior tibial osteotomy for osteochondral transplant exposure of talar dome lesions. Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery. 2013 March;12(1):49-54.

Hall S, Lundeen G, Shanin A. Not just a sprain: 4 foot and ankle injuries you may be missing. J Fam Pract. 2012 Apr;61(4):198-204

 Lundeen, G. Ankle fractures – complications – malunion.  Surgery of the Foot & Ankle. Ch. 37, pp 2011-2012, 8th ed., October 2011.

Giza E, Lundeen G, Campanelli V, Sullivan M. Ankle instability ligament reconstruction with immediate weightbearing. Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery. 2011 Sept;10(3):100-104.

Sara S, Kenyhertz G, Herbert T, Lundeen G.Fat emboli syndrome in a nondisplaced tibia fracture. J Orthrop Trauma. 2011 Mar;25(3):e27-9. doi: 10.1097/BOT.0b013e31820bbafb.

Giza E, Sullivan M, Ocel D, Lundeen G. Mitchell M, Veris L, Walton J. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation of talus articular defects. Foot & Ankle Int. 2010 Sept;31(9):747-753.

Giza E, Sullivan M, Ocel D, Lundeen G. Mitchell M, Frizzell L. First metatarsophalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. Int Orthop. 2010 May;4:1193-1198.

Lundeen G, Sara S. Technique tip: The use of a washer and suture endobutton in revision Lisfranc fixation. Foot Ankle Int. 2009 July;713-5.

Chou LB, Coughlin MT, Hansen S Jr, Haskell A, Lundeen GA, Saltzman CL, Mann RA. Osteoarthritis of the ankle: The role of arthroplasty. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2008 May;16(5):249-59.

Lundeen GA, Masonis J, Frick SL. Sequelae of pediatric hip disorders: A survey of adult reconstruction experts. Am J Orthop. 2008;37(3):153-156.

Bloebaum RD, Lundeen GA, Whitaker EL, Shea JE. Age-related mineralization heterogeneity changes in trabecular bone of the proximal femur. Anatomic Record. 281(2):1296-302.

Connor PM, Lundeen GA. The rheumatoid elbow: Current concepts and controversies. Curr Opin Orthop. 2003;14:302-6.

Lundeen GA, Knecht SL, Vajda EG, Bloebaum RD, Hofmann AA. The contribution of cortical and cancellous bone to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements in the female proximal femur. Osteoporosis International. 2001;12(3):192-8.

Lundeen GA, Vajda EG, Bloebaum RD. Age-related cancellous bone loss in the proximal femur of Caucasian females. Osteoporosis International. 2000;11(6):505-11.

Yandow SM, Lundeen GA, Scott SM, Coffin C. Autogenic bone marrow injections as a treatment for simple bone cyst. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 1998 Sep-Oct;18(5):616-20.

Lundeen GA, Shea KG, Sanderson C, Bachus KN, Bloebaum RD. Technique for identification of submicron metal particulate from implants in histological specimens. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 1998 Summer;43(2):168-74.

Bloebaum RD, Lundeen GA, Bachus KN, Ison I, Hofmann AA. Dissolution of particulate hydroxyapatite in a macrophage organelle model. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 1998 Apr;40(1):104-14.

Shea KG, Lundeen GA, Bloebaum RD, Bachus KN, Zou L. Lymphoreticular dissemination of metal particles after primary joint replacements. Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research. 1997 May;(338):219-26.

Shea KG, Lundeen GA, Bachus KN, Bloebaum RD, Dunn HK. Inability of energy dispersive x-ray analysis to identify particulate polyethylene. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 1996 Feb;30(2):175-80.

The Center for Foot & Ankle

The foot and ankle are magnificently designed to take us where we need to go, but when they hurt from injury, disease, deformity, or other problems, life can be difficult. We heartily invite you into The Center for Foot & Ankle, starting with exploring our website. We trust as you enter in, you will find the help you need from our team, our services, and our educational information.